Pitchers and Poets on Rules of the Game

Here’s an excerpt of Pitchers and Poet’s review of Rules of the Game:  The Best Sports Writing from Harper’s Magazine:

The best of the 28 stories collected in “Rules of the Game” are quirky, literary, and decidedly specific. (Rigorously selected from the 29 or so pieces of sports writing published in the entire history of Harper’s?). If these stories say anything expansive or ambitious, it is only because they are poignantly written – and the best writing, whether poetry or prose, fiction or non-fiction, everything-else writing or sports writing can’t help but speak to universal truths.

The gems in “Rules of the Game” are spaced nicely through the book. And like any anthology, the reward comes not from taking these in stories consecutively, but from reading them here and there. It took three months of carrying a copy around in my backpack before I felt comfortable enough to write this review. And even now, I haven’t quite read everything.

When I first pick up an anthology, I’m drawn to the authors I know and love. There is no shortage of them here: the cover boasts contributions from George Plimpton and Mark Twain, among others. And their stories, as expected, live up to the hype.

Slate gives love to our sports anthology Rules of the Game

Below is an excerpt from Noreen Malone’s review of Rules of the Game:  The Best Sports Writing from Harper’s Magazine on Slate.  You can read the full review here.

Harper’s Magazine has produced a remarkable amount of it in its 160-year history, the gems of which are now collected in Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing From Harper’s Magazine. There are meditations on the enterprise itself (Gary Cartwright on the practice of sportswriting, for example.), but lest you think this is a pointy-headed, navel-gazing book, such selections are tempered by vigorous reported pieces—George Plimpton on the Moscow Olympics or, delightfully, on the sonnet-inspiring meeting of Marianne Moore and Muhammad Ali; Lewis Lapham on the steroid scandals. The table of contents is a murderer’s row of American writers: Mark Twain, Shirley Jackson, Tom Wolfe.

SI’s Richard Deitsch on Rules of the Game

Sports Illustrated writer Richard Deitsch attended our press event for Rules of the Game on Tuesday, May 25.  Today, Deitsch wrote about the party and our surprising partnership with Rules of the GameDeadspin in his Media Circus column.

He wrote:

The answer: Former major league pitcher Jim Bouton, noted author Roy Blount Jr. and the editors of Deadspin and Harper’s Magazine.

The question?

What group of people did I never expect to see at the same party?

But there they were cohosting an event Tuesday night in New York City to promote Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing From Harpers Magazine. The book features pieces from George Plimpton, Tom Wolfe and Mark Twain, among others, and a particularly fun yarn for sports media junkies: Gary Cartwright's Confessions of a Washed-up Sportswriter. “Sportswriting is a young man's profession,” Cartwright wrote in 1968. “No one improves after eight or ten years, but the assignments get juicier and the way out less attractive. After eight or ten years there is nothing else to say. Every word in every style has been set in print, every variation from discovery to death explored. The ritual goes on, an the mind bends under it.”

(this post was reblogged from thetickr)
We’re selling Harper’s Magazine caps online now.  We first got these baseball caps as a promotional item to go along with Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing from Harper’s Magazine, but the caps were so cute we wanted to make them available to our readers.  Check ‘em out!   

We’re selling Harper’s Magazine caps online now.  We first got these baseball caps as a promotional item to go along with Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing from Harper’s Magazine, but the caps were so cute we wanted to make them available to our readers.  Check ‘em out!   

Special Delivery from Harper’s Magazine

thetickr:


We’re excited to announce that Harper’s Magazine has asked The Tickr to review their new sports book, Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing from Harper’s Magazine!

I know we’re as shocked as you! But wait there’s more! They’ve supplied us with two copies of the book, to giveaway to our followers!

Watch out for a post next week, with our review and details on how to win a copy of Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing from Harper’s Magazine!

Check out the Tickr…they’re doing a giveaway of our book.

(this post was reblogged from thetickr)

I wish this skateboarding bulldog could make an appearance at our Rules of the Game launch party next month.  He’s sporty!

We just got some Harper’s Magazine caps in.  What do you think?  Should we sell them in our online bookstore

Selectism, the online fashion magazine for men, gives ROTG some love

Selectism’s Nick Schonberger had this to say about Rules of the Game today:

In one sweep of the Harper’s archive, Rules of the Game Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing From Harpers Magazinecollects some of the most venerable voices of American writing in a single volume. Yes, they all talk sports. But, they do so in a way that touches the varied threads of American life, building larger societal issues – race, for example – as they tackle the games that amuse us all. The earliest of the essays (from 1903) finds James B. Connolly chatting about German ships.  The bookend essay (chronologically speaking), by Lewis H. Lapham from 2008, address drug use in Major League Baseball.

The joy of Rules of the Game Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing From Harpers Magazine comes in part through the pacing of the essays. They are not divided by theme, there is no strong push to plod along year by year. Instead editors Matthew Stevenson and Michael Martin allow the pieces to flow naturally, providing snapshots of American history through the lens of sports. A personal favorite comes from Pete Axthelm, whose “The City Game” brings the basketball courts of New York City alive. The racial changes to the game are tackled, working to not to seperate but to hammer down the socio-economic concerns that root basketball in the urban American landscape.

Axthelm’s essay is just one of many rich snap shots within Rules of the Game Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing From Harpers Magazine, a book which has enough depth to engage any reader regardless of sporting bend.

Out from April, 1, 2010, from Franklin Square Press. Preorder from Amazon Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing From Harpers Magazine.

The piece can be found here, on Selectism.

Matthew Stevenson, co-editor of Rules of the Game: The Best Sports Writing from Harper’s Magazine, shares this picture from last year when he was working on the book. 

He writes:  Here’s a picture of the manuscript arranged into the sections.  I used to lay it out on the floor, and walk around it, trying to decide what worked and what didn’t.

And now the book is available for purchase.  Lucky you!